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“The only excuse for making a useless thing is that one admires it intensely.”

The title of this post comes from the preface to one of my favorite books, The Picture of Dorian Gray, by Oscar Wilde. I chose it because it relates to the collection of designs I chose for the launch of this clothing brand.

This quote popped in my head when my wife looked at my designs and asked if I thought about including some interesting text or quotes with the illustrations. I hadn’t. I told her I didn’t want context or ideas attached to these designs.

I might very well design shirts with ideas on or behind them in the future, but for this collection I want anyone who looks at these to make their decision to buy them or not buy them based on what they see in from of them and how it makes them feel.

I’ve gone decades loving songs I didn’t understand the lyrics to (the Buena Vista Social Club comes to mind) or thought I knew what the singers were saying but looked up the lyrics and realized I was completely wrong. What about jazz or classical music? I have no idea what Miles Davis was thinking or feeling when he created Kind of Blue (Spotify) but it’s one of my Top 5 favorite albums of all time. Glenn Gould’s 1981 recording of the Bach’s Goldberg Variations is in my Top 5 too. You don’t have to understand a work of art to admire it.

So whether it’s a Judo flip, a woman’s head, or a phonograph, there’s no message, only the one you bring to it. Do you like it? Do you dislike it?

Sometimes background and context enhances art and sometimes it ruins it, and in the case of these tees, there’s no context to be had.

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